Has your launch just failed miserably? Read this.

Hey hey hey, there!

If you're at the tail end of a launch that didn't go so well, this is for you. (And NO, it's not all about my hair.)

how to fix your failed launch

 

I'm majorly bummed about something. After babying my hair for a year and a half - using all sorts of conditioners and treatments and potions, only washing it with the tears of a fairy in the light of a full moon, and blowdrying it with a hairdryer made of platinum and children's wishes (to counteract the fact that I color the bajeezus out of it), it's finally long enough to touch my shoulders.

And it's breaking. A lot.

I tried to make the best of the situation.

I tried to make the best of the situation.

This is TERRIBLY ANNOYING to me. Even worse? It's not the first time this has happened.

The last time was in October of 2015. A sizable chunk came off as my stylist was brushing it out after a color treatment and we just stared at each other in the mirror, eyes as round as saucers, both of us thinking, "Holy crap, did that just happen???"

And I lived with it like that for about two days, then I had a hissy fit and was like, NO MORE and cut it all off into an pixie style. Don't get me wrong - the pixie cut is totally cute on some people, but DUDE when you want to look super fancy, or even just throw it all into a messy bun or a ponytail? The emergency pixie is not where it's at.

It took me all this time - coming up on two years - to grow it all back again. And it's freaking BREAKING again.

I could very well cut it all off again. I'm irritated enough because HONESTLY, doesn't my hair KNOW how good I treat it? How can it DO THIS TO ME AGAIN????

 

 

 

What does this long story have to do with you, right? I mean, we ALL love my hair, I know, but surely not enough to talk about it in a blog post.

My hair = your launch.

More specifically, my breaking hair = your failed launch.

You put so much time and effort into that thing. First, you dreamed it up - with happy customers and dollar signs in your eyes. Then you built it, recorded it, breathed it into life.

Maybe you even washed it in the tears of a fairy in the light of the full moon. I mean, that would be weird, but I don't know what the heck your launch was about, so maybe.

And then when you went to sell it, you started to notice the cracks. Not that many people opted in. Then even fewer opened the emails, and when it came time to buy?

CRICKETS.

I know that feeling - when you expect to see the sales come rolling in and they DON'T, it's like a punch to the gut.

What.

The.

Hizzy.

Happened.

Then, as soon as you stop feeling nauseated, you want to BURN IT ALL DOWN. Ugh, the sales page was obviously crap. The pre-launch content was embarrassing. The people who shared it were lying about how great their lists were. The price was too high. And what kind of an idiot were you to think you could even do this, anyway?

So you hide it from your navigation. You cut it all off, and you try not to think about it ever again.

I know it hurts. I know it's embarrassing. I know that when your friends ask, "So how'd that launch thing go, anyway?" you mumble for a sec and change the subject because you'd rather die than share how hard you failed.

Just like with my hair, though? THIS IS THE WRONG APPROACH.

If your launch didn't go as planned (or your hair broke off unceremoniously), it doesn't mean it's time to quit.

It means it's time to reevaluate.

Take a few days to lick your wounds and then start from the top.

Did you get enough traffic?

Was the traffic qualified?

Was the opt in content relevant to the offer?

What was the open rate on your emails? Did you retarget those emails to the people who didn't open with new subject lines?

How many people actually made it to the sales page?

Did you test out the BUY NOW button to make sure it works? (You laugh now, but this was a problem for someone I spoke to yesterday. I went through her whole sales funnel and WHAM - the BUY NOW button led to a dead page. Oops.)

Did you remind people the offer existed? How many times?

 

You see what I'm getting at here? This can be a frustrating list of things to review, but it is OH-SO-IMPORTANT to go through.

Instead of burning everything down, take a breather, then come back and see where things fell apart. Then fix them and RUN THE LAUNCH AGAIN. Yes, the same program / course / service.

No one will laugh at you. It's likely that people won't even notice. Listen, did NASA make to the moon on the first try? HELL NO - they blew up so much stuff it cost millions and millions of dollars and they were just like, "Well, that happened. Let's fix that thingamajigger and go again."

Where would we all be if everyone took their ball and went home after the first time they failed?

We'd all have emergency haircuts and there would be no Matt Damon movie about going to Mars because we never even would have left the stratosphere. (It's important to note that I'm not super well-versed in space travel stuff.)

 

Here's the deal -

Failing SUCKS. But did you really fail? Or did you just get the information you need to move on and try it again?

I'm thinking it's the latter.

I'm thinking you're just about ready to get up, dust off, and try again.

And the best part of all? You already have ALL THE STUFF you need to launch. You don't need to hire a graphic designer to make a workbook. You don't need to spend hours writing your content. You don't even need to buy new tools or headshots or anything at all.

You just need to see what happened last time and tinker with the marketing.

You can do this.

You CAN.

 

That's all I wanted to say about that. If you want someone to take a top down look at what happened with you, you know where to find me.

And if you're still curious about what I'm going to do with my hair, I guess we'll find out together. I'm not cutting it all off again, though - I've waited TOO LONG to have it the way I want, and I'm not starting over from almost scratch again.

 

All right - you go get back to work on building your Uncommonly Good Biz, and I'll do the same.

Smooches, cheers, etc.

- Misha